UK still top in Western Europe for family breakdown

16-Mar-2015

For the second year running, Britain hangs onto the unwelcome top spot for family breakdown across Western Europe.

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First comes love, then comes marriageā€¦ tying the knot before first baby is a key ingredient for marriage success

09-Mar-2015

In the first ever UK study of its kind, new research from Marriage Foundation, a think tank dedicated to building stronger families, has found that the recipe for relationship success lies in making the decision to commit before starting a family.

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Couples who stay together enjoy degree-equivalent boost to income

01-Mar-2015

Staying together can have the same positive impact on subsequent income as having a degree, a new study by Marriage Foundation has found.

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Marriage Foundation hails six years of marriage stability

28-Jan-2015

New figures from the Office for National Statistics show the proportion of married families in Britain has been stable for the last six years.

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Marriage Foundation/Sunday Times debate:"Is there a difference between marriage and cohabitation?"

19-Dec-2014

Marriage Foundation and the Sunday Times jointly hosted a well attended and much noticed debate at the News Building on January 8th.

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Positive benefits of marriage 

  • Higher incomes and greater accumulation of wealth (and avoiding the loss of income that tends to follow the breakdown of relationships) See, for example, Zagorsky, Marriage and Divorce’s Impact on Wealth

    http://jos.sagepub.com/content/41/4/406.short

  • Improved health and wellbeing. One study suggests that ‘the size of the health gain from marriage is remarkable -it may be as large as the benefit from giving up smoking’

    www2.warwick.ac.uk/fac/soc/economics/staff/academic/oswald/healthlong2005.pdf

  • Cohabiting people are significantly less happy in their relationships than married people, and children are happier when growing up with both biological parents (Understanding Society survey, ONS)

  • A typical finding of cross-national studies is that “much can be done to improve child wellbeing through economic and other supports where the institution of marriage has seriously weakened and cohabitation has become common. But even in nations that have the most extensive welfare measures, such as the Scandinavian countries and France, a substantial gap in child wellbeing remains between those children who grow up in intact families, and those who do not… all the evidence we have shows that individuals fare best, both in childhood and in later life, when they benefit from the economic and emotional investments of their natural parents who reside together continuously and cooperate in raising them.” Popenoe, D. 2009. Social Science and Public Policy. Vol 46, Number 5, pp. 429-436. 
    http://www.springerlink.com/content/h155411803161mv5/